• New Measure Eligible for California’s November 8, 2016 Ballot: Requires Condoms for Adult Movie Actors

    Others have entered the signature collection phase: Revenue Bonds, Electricity, Marijuana and more

    A measure which would require performers in adult films to use condoms during filming of sexual intercourse has become eligible for the November 8, 2016, General Election ballot. The measure would require producers of adult films to pay for performer vaccinations, testing, and medical examinations related to sexually transmitted infections. It would require producers to obtain state health license at beginning of filming and to post condom requirement at film sites. The measure would impose liability on producers for violations, on certain distributors, on performers if they have a financial interest in the violating film, and on talent agents who knowingly refer performers to noncomplying producers. It would permit state, performers, or any state resident to enforce violations.

    Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potentially reduced state and local tax revenue of millions or tens of millions of dollars per year. Likely state costs of a few million dollars annually to administer the law. Possible ongoing net costs or savings for state and local health and human services programs. (15-0004.)

    In order to become eligible for the ballot, the initiative needed 365,880 valid petition signatures, which is equal to five percent of the total votes cast for governor in the November 2014 General Election.

    An initiative can qualify via random sampling of petition signatures if the sampling projects a number of valid signatures greater than 110 percent of the required number.  The initiative needed at least 402,468 projected valid signatures to qualify by random sampling, and it exceeded that threshold today.

    On June 30, 2016, the Secretary of State will certify the initiative as qualified for the November 8, 2016, General Election ballot, unless the proponent(s) withdraws the initiative prior to that date pursuant to Elections Code section 9604(b).

    The proponent of this initiative is Michael Weinstein. The proponent can be reached c/o Bradley W. Hertz at (818) 593-2949.

    Public Funding. Initiative Statute.

    Secretary of State Alex Padilla announced the proponent of this new initiative has been cleared to begin collecting petition signatures.

    The Attorney General’s official title and summary for the measure is as follows:

    The “Election Campaign Finance/Public Funding Inisitative Statute repeals the ban on public funding of election campaigns. The measure directs Legislature to create a public financing system for elections. It delays effective date of any such legislation until after the next election of the Legislature, unless there is no cost to taxpayers. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potentially significant state and local government costs to provide public funds to pay for campaigns and other unknown fiscal effects. Increased state and local government costs—possibly exceeding $1 million annually—to administer amended campaign laws, offset by increased fine revenue. (15-0057.)

    The Secretary of State’s tracking number for this measure is 1719 and the Attorney General’s tracking number is 15-0057.

    The proponent of the measure, Alison Hartson, must collect the signatures of 365,880 registered voters (five percent of the total votes cast for Governor in the November 2014 general election) in order to qualify it for the November 2016 ballot.

    The Attorney General prepares the legal title and summary that is required to appear on initiative petitions. When the official language is complete, the Attorney General forwards it to the proponent and to the Secretary of State, and the initiative may be circulated for signatures. The Secretary of State then provides calendar deadlines to the proponent and to county elections officials.

    The proponent has 180 days to circulate petitions for the measure, meaning the signatures must be submitted to county elections officials by May 4, 2016.  The proponent can be reached at (714) 878-9662.

    Lower the Drinking Age From 21 to 18

    A proposed initiative to lower the minimum drinking age in California from 21 to 18 enters circulation.The proponent of the initiative was cleared to begin collecting petition signatures. 

    The measure would lower the minimum legal drinking age in California from 21 to 18. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of the fiscal impact on state and local government:

    • Reduction in federal highway funds totaling roughly $200 million dollars annually.

    • Increased state and local tax revenues associated with the sale of alcoholic beverages totaling possibly several million dollars annually. (15-0054.)

    The Secretary of State’s tracking number for this measure is 1716 and the Attorney General’s tracking number is 15-0054.

    The proponent of the measure, Terrance Lynn, must collect the signatures of 365,880 registered voters (five percent of the total votes cast for Governor in the November 2014 general election) in order to qualify it for the November 2016 ballot. The proponent has 180 days to circulate petitions for the measure, meaning the signatures must be submitted to county elections officials by April 26, 2016.  The proponent can be reached at contact@theterrylynn.com. No phone number was provided.

    For more information about how an initiative qualifies for the ballot in California, go to www.sos.ca.gov/elections/ballot-measures/how-to-qualify-an-initiative.htm.

     Publicly Owned California Electrical Utility District

    A proposal to establish a publicly-owned California Electrical Utility District to provide electric service, replacing most investor-owned utilities, such as PG&E, Southern California Edison, San Diego Gas & Electric, and Bear Valley Electric, has qualified for begin circulation. The measure would exempts publicly-owned electric utilities, unless they voluntarily elect to join. It woould require the District be divided into 11 wards, approximately equal in population and would establish an 11-member board of directors—one member per ward—each elected for 4-year terms. The District would be granted the power to acquire property, construct facilities necessary to supply electricity, set electricity rates, impose taxes, and issue bonds.

    Fiscal impact: It is the opinion of the Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance that the measure would result in a substantial net change in state and local finances. (15-0056.) The documentation does no state what that net change might be.

    The Secretary of State’s tracking number for this measure is 1718 and the Attorney General’s tracking number is 15-0056.

    The proponent of the measure, Ben Davis, Jr., must collect the signatures of 365,880 registered voters (five percent of the total votes cast for Governor in the November 2014 general election) in order to qualify it for the November 2016 ballot. The proponent has 180 days to circulate petitions for the measure, meaning the signatures must be submitted to county elections officials by April 26, 2016.  The proponent can be reached at (916) 833-7894.

     Legalization and Regulation of Marijuana

    A measure which would legalize marijuana under state law, Create a commission to license and regulate marijuana industry and establish procedures for resentencing of persons convicted of nonviolent marijuana offenses has been cleared for proponents to begin collecting signatures. The measure would also impose a state excise tax on marijuana of $.42 per gram of dried marijuana and $2.00 per gram of concentrated marijuana. It would impose a temporary additional state excise tax of 2.5 percent on marijuana retail sales and permit local taxes of up to 10 percent on marijuana sales, with voter approval.

    The measure would provide for collection of marijuana taxes by the State Board of Equalization. It would exempt medical marijuana from some taxation and would limit local regulation of marijuana. The Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance estimates fiscal impact on state and local government forecasts reduced costs in enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, and several hundrd million dollars in tax revenues.

    Reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders.

    Net additional state and local tax revenues of potentially up to several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, most of which is designated to be spent on drug education and counseling services, state parks, research related to the medical use of marijuana, and regulation of commercial marijuana activities. (15-0052.)

    The Secretary of State’s tracking number for this measure is 1714 and the Attorney General’s tracking number is 15-0052.

    The proponents of the measure, Chad M. Hanes and Marinda D. Hanes, must collect the signatures of 365,880 registered voters (five percent of the total votes cast for Governor in the November 2014 general election) in order to qualify it for the November 2016 ballot. The proponents have 180 days to circulate petitions for the measure, meaning the signatures must be submitted to county elections officials by April 26, 2016.  The proponents can be reached at (415) 915-5420.

    Preconditions for nuclear power plants

    A new initiative which extends statutory preconditions, currently applicable to new operation of any nuclear powerplant, to existing Diablo Canyon Power Plant has entered the signature phase. Before further electricity production at any plant, the initiative requires the California Energy Commission to find the federal government has approved technology for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. For nuclear powerplants requiring reprocessing of fuel rods, the measure would require the Commission to find that the federal government has approved technology for nuclear fuel rod reprocessing plants. Both findings would be subject to the State Legislature’s rejection.

    The measure would also require the California Energy Commission to find on case-by-case basis that facilities will be available with adequate capacity to reprocess or store powerplant’s fuel rods.

    If enacted, there are potential impacts on state and local finances in the form of decreased revenues and increased costs due to possible electricity price increases and state liabilities. The magnitude of these impacts are uncertain, but could be significant, according to State officials, depending in part on the need for system upgrades for replacement power and whether the state would be liable for investment losses. These losses might also be offset by the potential avoidance of major future state and local government costs and lost revenues in the rare event of a major nuclear power plant incident. (15-0055.)

    The Secretary of State’s tracking number for this measure is 1717 and the Attorney General’s tracking number is 15-0055.

    The proponent of the measure, Ben Davis, Jr., must collect the signatures of 365,880 registered voters (five percent of the total votes cast for Governor in the November 2014 general election) in order to qualify it for the November 2016 ballot. The proponent has 180 days to circulate petitions for the measure, meaning the signatures must be submitted to county elections officials by April 26, 2016.  The proponent can be reached at (916) 833-7894.

    No political party preference for Congressional candidates on the election ballot

    Thinking of running for Congress? This new measure, which is out for signatures now, bars candidates for United States Congress or state elective office from listing their political party preference, or lack of political party preference, on the election ballot. 

    There would be no direct fiscal effect on state or local governments. (15-0053.)

    The Secretary of State’s tracking number for this measure is 1715 and the Attorney General’s tracking number is 15-0053.

    The proponent of the measure, Terrance Lynn, must collect the signatures of 585,407 registered voters (eight percent of the total votes cast for Governor in the November 2014 general election) in order to qualify it for the November 2016 ballot. The proponent has 180 days to circulate petitions for the measure, meaning the signatures must be submitted to county elections officials by April 26, 2016.  The proponent can be reached at contact@theterrylynn.com. No phone number was provided.

     Revenue Bonds to Need Voter Approval

    Another measure which would require statewide voter approval would be required before any revenue bonds can be issued or sold by the state for projects that are financed, owned, operated, or managed by the state or any joint agency created by or including the state, if the bond amount exceeds $2 billion. This potential measure prohibits dividing projects into multiple separate projects to avoid statewide voter approval requirement.

    Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government:  The fiscal effect on state and local governments is unknown and would vary by project. It would depend on (1) the outcome of projects brought before voters, (2) the extent to which the state relied on alternative approaches to the projects or alternative financing methods for affected projects, and (3) whether those methods have higher or lower costs than revenue bonds. (15-0003.)

    The proponent of this initiative is Dean Cortopassi. The proponent can be reached c/o Kurt Oneto at (916) 446-6752.

    Statute of Limitations: Child Abuse Claims

    Cleared to begin collecting petition signatures is a measure which would eliminate the statute of limitations for civil actions based on childhood sexual abuse committed on or after the effective date of the measure. It would eliminate the statute of limitations for felony prosecutions for certain sexual crimes committed against children on or after the effective date of the measure, and for such crimes committed before the effective date of the measure for which the statute of limitations has not yet expired.

    Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Probably minor increase in costs to the state courts, as well as the state and local criminal justice system, from an increase in cases filed and individuals convicted. The fiscal impact on local governments related to civil claims is not likely to be significant on a statewide basis, but the effect on individual local government entities could vary substantially. (15-0059.)

    The Secretary of State’s tracking number for this measure is 1721 and the Attorney General’s tracking number is 15-0059. The proponent of the measure, William Lynch, must collect the signatures of 365,880 registered voters (five percent of the total votes cast for Governor in the November 2014 general election) in order to qualify it for the November 2016 ballot. The proponent has 180 days to circulate petitions for the measure, meaning the signatures must be submitted to county elections officials by May 9, 2016.  The proponent can be reached at (415) 307-6004.

     

     

     

     

    posted to Cedar Street Times on November 9, 2015

    Topics: Front PG News

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